Stonehenge revisited 2017

I visited Stonehenge ten years ago on my birthday (April 2007). This year, in 2017 my parents again asked me, what I would like do on my birthday. And again I said i would like to visit Stonehenge.

We made the thirty minute drive to the henge from their home. I was taken a back this time by the changes that had taken place. A huge visitors centre had now sprung up quite a distance from the site. There was a stone-age encampment near by the visitors’ centre and the biggest change of all was that you now have to get a minibus up to the stones.

My father and myself jumped the bus, and in a throng of Japanese, Italian, and German tourists – in fact nationalities from all over the globe, we made our way to the stones. It was hard to get decent shot with the number of people taking selfies around the stones, and just the general crowd.

There seems to have been a definite shift in the culture of Stonehenge – it now represents not something ancient anymore but something definitively modern – and that is a monetary value, what profit can be made.

A journey north

On the way north…

Angel of the North

Bamburgh Castle

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A view of the sea from Bamburgh beach
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Bamburgh Castle coming up close, taken from the dunes
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The imposing walls of Bamburgh Castle, (Northumbria)
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Bamburgh Castle in the mist (taken from Holy Island)

 


Al Hambra & Gardens

There is no reference to the Alhambra as being a residence of kings, until the 13th century, even though a fortress had existed since the 9th century. The first kings of Granada, the Zirites, had their castles and palaces on the hills of the Albaicin, and nothing remains of them. The Nasrites were the emirs that built the Alhambra, starting in 1238.

The complex of palaces; this residence of the kings of Granada was constructed from the ruins of the former fortress, by the founder of the dynasty, Alhamar, who commenced work in the thirteenth century. Mostly the buildings that have survived however, date from the fourteenth century.

The Alhambra became a Christian court in 1492 when the Catholic Monarchs (Ferdinand and Isabel) conquered the city of Granada.

Palacios Nazaríes – Alhambra

A night visit to the Alhambra

We waited patiently as the sun set over the Alhambra. As the light faded into the west, the sun dipping down below the horizon, spreading shadows across the walls of this majestic palace. The security man, lifted the barrier and we entered; for our night visit to the Alhambra….

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Granada, Plaza del toros.

A Week in Spain

On Saturday morning, we went to Granada’s Plaza Del Toros; to have a look at the Bull Ring. There was no fight on at this time of day and the arena was closed; for cleaning. I asked the janitor who was hosing down the dust, if we could have a look inside. He very kindly agreed and let us in to have a look around.

“EL TOREO ES TORTURA NI ES NI ARTE NI CULTURA”

A week in Granada

Just recently, I flew to Malaga with a friend and we transferred to Granada by bus. I then spent a week in Granada photographing the city and the Al Hambra; with its imposing walls. What lay outside these walls was a beautiful and vibrant city with a lot of atmosphere. The temperatures were some days in the forties and this was pretty hard to bear. But with its love of fountains and stunning architecture and not forgetting the people – Granada offers a great opportunity to the photographer.

Kathmandu Streets

“Kathmandu is alive, vibrant, magical a living city. I have never know a more colourfully textured, rich and aromatic place. To give it it’s due, Kathmandu is a very busy place. Everybody seems either constantly on the move, or quite conversely – sitting through the heat of the midday sun. It is a peaceful city despite its, diversity and noise. Eagles fly silently above the city heights, dogs scrap for left overs in the streets, and kids run a muck. The pollution in Kathmandu can be unbearable, but which does not detract from my love of it in the least.”